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Differentiation during a Cloud(ed) Market

An Interview with Rob Davies, Sales & Marketing Director of Pulsant

Let’s be honest – while there are tons of cloud vendors out there all promising the simplest service, highest performing solution and greatest capabilities, the truth is that not all of the marketing talk may be a true reflection of what is often delivered. information technology education It takes time and considerable effort to go through the offerings within the market and selecting the foremost appropriate solution is usually not simply about the answer itself but the resources, expertise and credentials of the seller.

What differentiates Pulsant from the remainder of the market?

It’s not only one thing. I feel it's a mixture of our core strengths, like our flexible approach to developing an outcome for our customers, our resources from our ten data centres and 10G core network to our owned and managed cloud platforms, and our accreditations just like the Royal Warrant, being HPCloud Agile, ISO 27001, PCI DSS and now STAR**.

I believe our most vital differentiator is that the incontrovertible fact that we invest within the best people. The Pulsant team is devoted, knowledgeable and works towards an equivalent objective, which is to deliver what our clients need within the best way possible that specialize in the standard of that delivery.

Why does one regard your data centres as a strength?

Not only can we own 10 data centres strategically located throughout the united kingdom, but we also own the 10G network that connects them together. together of the most important regional data centre players within the UK market, we recognise that our data centre network addresses the wants of the many IT departments and corporations that want to be physically on the brink of their IT assets.

The Pulsant team is devoted, knowledgeable and works towards an equivalent objective, which is to deliver what our clients need…

Speed of access, service and site is therefore important to them and are all issues that are answered by our network. We recently made a £1.5M investment in refreshing our core network infrastructure and we’re now running the newest Cisco routing and switching fabric designed to supply scalability and deliver new services into the longer term.

From a cloud provider perspective, having the ability to supply services in multiple UK locations, connected by a high-speed resilient network is critical within the delivery of a strong solution and competing during this market.

What bandwidth connectivity options do you offer?

When it involves connectivity the choices are often endless, we own the dedicated 10G core network that connects our sites, and that we offer competitive IP transit, or Internet services, in and out of our data centres, and content delivery networks. we've partnerships in situ with all the key network carriers centres in order that our customers can select their vendor of choice. This provides our clients with the connectivity they require in, out and between our data centres and whatever size they have.

Why does one consider flexibility to be a core strength?

It sounds pretty simple, but often customers don’t know exactly what they need or need…

Our approach is to make solutions around what our clients want, be it technical or commercial, and it's through our flexibility and consultative approach that this is often accomplished. We believe that there’s no one-size-fits-all model, and ensuring our customers get the simplest, most appropriate solution is vital. This involves assisting in determining the wants, expectations and objectives then offering advice on which solutions would be suited to deal with those needs. It sounds pretty simple, but often customers don’t know exactly what they need or need – and therefore the incontrovertible fact that ready to "> we will customise solutions supported our resources and expertise means we are able to deliver a far better service. This approach also works if the customer wants to use Pulsant solutions with their existing partners – we’re ready to dovetail into that effectively.

Why were you awarded a Royal Warrant?

We’ve been providing managed hosting and cloud services to the Royal Household for over five years…

We’ve been providing managed hosting and cloud services to the Royal Household for over five years and were awarded the Royal Warrant this year. it had been given in recognition of the continued exceptional service that we deliver to the Royal Household – it’s important to notice that not all suppliers achieve this. It fully complements our other accreditations, including our ISO rating, PCI DSS, IL2 and IL3 level security, and further reinforces our reputation as a trusted and secure provider in managing sensitive customer data.

When did you become an HPCloud Agile partner and why?

We’ve been a politician HPCloud Agile partner for 2 years and saw this chance as a superb way of using the world-class HP hardware platform to deliver our cloud platform. HP may be a great brand and a recognised sign of quality and that we felt that in terms of technology and innovation is aligned with and underpinned our drive to supply an enterprise-class outcome to customers.

And while being a part of this programme doesn't set us apart on its own, we feel that our scale, UK presence, customers, facilities, the innovation and use of our cloud platform and data centre capacity, does differentiate us.

Every customer is equal

In essence, we own the whole supply chain and during this way, we will manage whatever outcome our clients want – whether or not they need a complete solution from network connectivity and data centre services, to if they need to form use of our colocation services on their own network. we've a huge array of clients across industries and sizes, who trust us with their mission-critical data. Though the extent of service may vary, the very fact remains that within our systems we manage the supply and security of that data for them.

What role do Distributors have in Cloud Computing?

By Luke Wheeler

News hot off the press in the week was the announcement from Westcoast – a serious UK channel distributor – that they need to be teamed up with HP to create a cloud service for channel partners.

It’s reported that Westcoast’s HP cloud platform will offer their core customer-base of IT resellers and repair providers, the power to resell on-demand cloud infrastructure (IaaS) and software (SaaS). the thought being that resellers can go-to-market with comprehensive cloud offerings, without carrying any of the burdens of major capital expenditures or systems management headaches. As Michael Clifford, Director of Cloud Computing, for HP UK & Ireland, confirms: “Owning, managing and utilising a knowledge centre frightens many resellers. HP Converged Cloud will enable Westcoast to demystify cloud for its resellers and make top quality cloud services easily available to anyone wishing to supply them.”

A warehouse filled with the physical.

Whilst, in fact, Westcoast won’t be closing down their conventional model of distributing physical tin any time soon, this bold strategic move is diagnostic a transformation in IT consumption – one that favours flexibility, on-demand provisioning & utilisation, fast deployment and ubiquitous accessibility. It’s fair to mention that with every virtual cloud server purchased, that’s potentially one less physical server moving off Westcoast’s warehouse shelves – so when the market goes faraway from you, you've got to manoeuvre to catch up with the market.

In the same way that major hardware & systems manufacturers have relied on Distributors to manage channel customers, product education, credit and logistics – there's good reason to believe that such a task can still be of importance when it involves selling virtual cloud services. Sure, there are some stark differences and fresh challenges in what the work entails, but at the top of the day what the reseller wants is access to a product, to understand how it'll benefit their customers, to form money thereon, and to be comfortable in knowing “it will just work”. All of this will come from the cloud.

Distribution is in an enviable position when it involves taking advantage of new technologies. Their customers are the trusted interface between the business user and therefore the technology, and its a proven relationship model which will be somewhat isolated from the industry hype and immune from fads and marketing spins.

The channel could ultimately be what stands between cloud computing becoming the ‘de facto’ standard way of doing things, and it being a neat toy for ‘innovators’ and ‘early adopters’.

What matters during this grassroots relationship is RoI and tangible operational and business benefits – and subsequently, the quiet majority of companies will take cloud only as and when it offers them these key things. The channel could ultimately be what stands between cloud computing becoming the ‘de facto’ standard way of doing things, and it being a neat toy for ‘innovators’ and ‘early adopters’.

In essence, then, that's the challenge for Distribution because it moves to cater to virtual product distribution. The ‘big idea’ that the likes of Westcoast are pursuing isn’t about the cloud itself – it's about continuing to enable their customers to succeed. If they focus an excessive amount of on the cloud itself or tie themselves in knots trying to price-match Amazon, Azure, Google and therefore the big players, then the chance – and indeed the channel – will gradually slip away.US Government to Increasingly Shift to Cloud-Based Services

By Christopher Morris, Tech Commentator

The growing significance – and increasing economic and computing significance of the cloud – remains lost on many sectors of the overall population. It comes across as a mysterious, somewhat enigmatic technology, of which many of us neither understand the advantages or the rationale behind switching thereto. Of course, to the initiated, the benefits of cloud computing are obvious, with the power to store or process vast amounts of knowledge without having to get appropriate storage equipment offering significant financial savings to both businesses and individuals.

With two-billion broadband users dotted around the globe, it goes without saying that there's an enormous marketplace for this technology. While it's yet to be haunted an outsized scale at the house user-level – although websites like Dropbox are getting increasingly popular – it's generally presumed that this may increase exponentially within the coming years. But corporate clients are already embracing this technology in droves, and therefore the history of IT, in common with many other industrial fields, tells us that enormous private sector businesses ultimately usually drive consumer behaviour.

…the history of IT[…] tells us that enormous private sector businesses ultimately usually drive consumer behaviour.

As businesses increasingly shift to third-party data storage in data centres managed by IT specialists and adopt cloud computing as a matter, in fact, cloud technology the accessibility of cloud computing will become more feasible to the typical computer user, as corporate uptake slowly but surely drives the worth down and helps assist within the development of the technology. This has been a standard meme with many previous technologies; the company sector drives its adoption and economic model before the everyday consumer gets on board when its price point and availability reaches a suitable level. In our technology-driven contemporary society, this process is usually much faster than it once was.

However, while the extent to which cloud computing is predicted to evolve the business and residential computing is widely acknowledged, there's a 3rd major interest which is additionally looking to participate during this industrial revolution also. Government entities are now also looking to leap on the cloud computing bandwagon, and this prospect raises many questions at the extent of both state and general public.

It should be noted firstly that this is often a wonderfully logical move, particularly given the historical links between the general public sector and therefore the Internet. it's widely known that the first Internet was eventually born because of military investment and research back within the 1960s. Thus, this now very commercial technology has its roots very firmly publicly sector investment.

Government entities are now also looking to leap on the cloud computing bandwagon…

Naturally, in these austere times, government agencies and departments are constantly trying to find ways to save lots of money and cut costs. during this regard, shifting as many of their functions and services as possible to the cloud might sound like facile sense. it's perfectly natural for the govt at both local and federal level to ascertain optimised business models which incorporate mass data storage by specialised units, thus negating the necessity for the state to get expensive, and perishable, IT equipment on a mass scale.

Already there are numerous government entities within us that have haunted the cloud computing baton. to take care of the military-industrial theme, there has been a robust soldiers identity to the first adopters, with the United States Army, Air Force and Navy all adopting cloud-based services, and other departments like the Department of Justice, US Development Agency, and therefore the Department of Education the following suit, with more expected to follow within the coming years.

The United States government is promoting this idea as to how to greatly streamline, and ultimately, improve government services… “maximize capacity utilization, improve IT flexibility and responsiveness, and minimize cost”.

The United States government is promoting this idea as to how to greatly streamline, and ultimately, improve government services. this is often a noble concept, of course, and quite possibly a feasible and achievable one. In accordance with this policy, the US federal has adopted the ‘Cloud First’ policy, so as to manage the systematic move to cloud-based services. This policy “mandates that agencies take full advantage of cloud computing benefits to maximise capacity utilization, improve IT flexibility and responsiveness, and minimize cost.” the main target within the youth of the scheme are going to be on shared services for state agencies, with the delivery of services for the populace likely to increasingly follow because the systems become consolidated.

This offers an excellent deal of potential for more joined-up services to be delivered by government, and lots of will believe that anything which reduces government bureaucracy, bureaucratic procedure and spending can only be an honest thing. Perhaps the sole thorny issue to be addressed which will be of interest many is the issue of privacy. within the shadow of a number of the less admirable revelations about the National Security Agency, this may be a problem of concern many Americans, and it's something which will need to be satisfactorily addressed before the general public is prepared to embrace cloud-based government services.

How is that the Cloud affecting the Colocation market and traditional Colocation Providers?

By Mark Underwood

CTC: Mark Underwood presents his view of traditional colocation markets, how cloud computing affects these markets, and the way colocation providers got to adapt to vary and embrace the cloud.

Colocation (or co-location) is “the act of placing multiple (sometimes related) entities within one location” (Wikipedia), and – to the present extent – Colocation and Cloud Computing are two services which were founded on very similar principles. Both cloud and colocation see customers coming together so as to profit from a purpose-built service or facility that in themselves, individually, they might be hard-pushed to afford, including manage.

The Cloud is within the House.

Despite this, you'll be surprised to find out that Cloud Computing is posing one among the best challenges to Colocation providers; it places a replacement set of demands on data centre operators and has dramatically surprised the standard profile and cross-section of consumers.

Cloud Computing …places a replacement set of demands on data centre operators, and has dramatically surprised the standard profile and cross-section of consumers.

So what's it about Cloud Computing that's forcing Colocation providers to re-examine their business models, facilities, and their approach to securing new and existing business?

Well, within the same way that the arrival of economic multi-tenant Data Centre (Colocation) facilities meant that companies not needed to take a position in power and cooling for his or her on-site makeshift ‘broom cupboard’ server rooms; Cloud Computing now provides businesses all the computing power they'll need without maintaining their own infrastructure.

The result's a shrinking colocation marketplace for traditional user enterprise colocation customers, caused by companies relocating their workloads to the Cloud. this is often especially noticeable within the mid-size enterprise sector where businesses are agile enough to quickly cash in of latest technology opportunities and historically invested less heavily in their own data centre infrastructure.

…despite on-going exponential growth in computing needs, a mid-size enterprise which will have needed 10 racks three years ago, now only needs two or three racks

It’s these disappearing mid-size enterprises that represented an outsized, reliable, predictable and profitable segment of your typical colocation provider’s customer base. Combine this with the increased density of computing resources and that we find that despite on-going exponential growth in computing needs, a mid-size enterprise which will have needed 10 racks three years ago, now only needs two or three racks.

The flipside of this is often the arrival of a replacement ‘super-breed’ of the customer to Colocation facilities. These are the cloud computing service providers – the very businesses that are taking over the relocated workloads from our traditional client base!

Whilst many of those Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) have morphed into existence from legacy web hosting businesses, systems integrators (SIs), managed service providers (MSPs) and indeed traditional IT value-add resellers (VARs), they need been joined by an entirely new breed of software providers, platform providers, and infrastructure providers offering their wares “as-a-service”. However no matter their origins, becoming a CSP has required a fresh and substantial investment in computing infrastructure and software.

[Cloud Service Providers] are looking to colocate the newest ultra-efficient high-density computing hardware. However, the newest hardware isn't as compatible with older data centres as you would possibly think.

As a result, CSPs are looking to colocate the newest ultra-efficient high-density computing hardware. However, the newest hardware isn't as compatible with older data centres as you would possibly think. virtualization technology Indeed, older data centre and colocation facilities which will are perfectly adequate for a colo customer of any size and orientation whilst little as two years ago, today fall an extended way in need of being capable support an increasingly large proportion of colocation Customers requiring high-density power and cooling solutions. So what options do these legacy operators have? One option is dropping their prices to draw in new business – and you don’t need to look far for super-cheap colocation racks – they're cheap for a reason. an alternative choice is to over-subscribe existing power and cooling resources – a dangerous strategy that no operator would admit to, but has the inevitable consequence of unplanned outages and falling service levels. (Google “data centre outage” for further reading.) the apparent correct option is to take a position in upgrades to the power – but the capital-intensive investment is pretty hard to return by immediately even for giant businesses – and did we mention the erosion of the prevailing core colo customer base of mid-size enterprises? So, many older data centre facilities – particularly those without really solid support – have their work cut-out to stay up with this brave new world, and this is often the most important upset within the market.

Meeting the requirements of Cloud Service Providers and Cloud Operators.

Cloud economies-of-scale are derived directly from the efficiency of the infrastructure or platform – and this includes the efficiency and economy (the value) offered by the underlying data centre. Cloud operators got to know that their data centre can match their ambitions, growth and uptime expectations.

Cloud operators also need connectivity and much of it – available all the time and scalable to the very best levels. Inevitably, bandwidth has become an increasingly important consideration for data centres – so factors like duct capacity, fibre entry, cross-connect methodology and management, re-sold and low-cost aggregated bandwidth offerings – also as rules and regulations for on-site network operators should be examined very closely.

Once you’ve determined that the colocation facility has what you would like so as to supply a stable and reliable foundation for your cloud service for both today’s and tomorrow’s requirements, you're likely to seek out that your short-list of providers is formed from the costlier facilities. So what can a colocation provider do more to help your cloud operation and your bottom line? At Virtus, we’ve examined this very challenge and are available up with Colo-on-Demand. It’s designed to align your colocation expenditure together with your cloud revenues. In other words, as your cloud customer computing requirements increase, you'll quickly and simply build up your colocation requirements. an equivalent goes for once they decrease. Our colocation flexes together with your cloud.

Cloud and Colocation were founded on very similar principles. At Virtus, we are committed to making sure that our colocation – and your cloud – tracks an equivalent productive path into the foreseeable future.