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India sees future in South Asia cloud

Indian government foresees a huge future for the cloud in South Asia

The future of India as an industrial powerhouse has been well understood a few times. information technology schools potential of this nation which still admittedly has massive social and economic problems are often illustrated by the subsequent statistic: the very best 25% of the Indian population with the highest IQs are greater in number than the entire population of us.

India has also been particularly related to information technology, employing quite 2.5 million people during this sector, and an identical number of individuals graduate annually with associated degrees from Indian universities. Graduation of two .5 million people once a year is roughly adequate to the whole combined population of British cities of Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow, and Edinburgh. India’s IT outsourcing industry already stands at over $50 billion once a year and is predicted to extend to $225 billion by 2020. India also produces over 500,000 engineers annually, and as 12% of its population speaks fluent English, it's expected that within the next decade India and China are going to be the 2 countries with the foremost English-speaking people within the world.

These facts should put into perspective the worldwide role that India will play, and indeed is playing, in information technology. It should hardly come as a surprise then that massive efforts are already been made within the state to embrace the cloud computing revolution. Just in the week, it had been announced that Meghraj, the Union government’s cloud computing project, is going to be released next month, with initial specialization in an e-Governance app store at a National Data Centre.

India’s IT outsourcing industry already stands at over $50 billion per annum… India produces over 500,000 engineers annually, and 12% of its population speaks fluent English.

The Indian government has announced that the Meghraj project also will be utilized as a repository and marketplace of e-governance apps, while there's a clear intention to increase the cloud computing project in India to the land registry, although there are still logistical issues to be settled during this regard.

India has already made strong progress in building its cloud infrastructure. virtualization technology here is already twenty-two data centers operating within the South Asian country, with tons of Indian government services already being delivered via the cloud. The Indian government states that its social services are already quite 50% travel by cloud applications, with the regions of Bihar, Mizoram, and Jharkhand, at a very advanced stage of implementation.

Though the Indian cloud is already considerably under construction, industry analysis indicates that this process will only accelerate within the coming years. consistent with a study from research firm Gartner, the Indian cloud services revenue will have a compounded annual rate of growth of 33.2% from 2012 through 2017 across every sector of the cloud computing market.

In addition, the Indian government has announced their intention to create a ‘Centre of Excellence’ for cloud computing, which can be critical to the longer-term development of the cloud in India. This center has been tasked with being instrumentally involved in capability building, also as having a remit associated with providing advisory services for state departments and usually spreading awareness among the general public sector in India of the growing importance of cloud computing.

Already Indian government departments are proven to possess saved money by switching to the cloud. A report in April highlighted that a previous Indian government cloud initiative had made savings for the general public sector like $80 million, thanks to savings on physical server costs.

Further, plans exist already to increase this prevalence for cloud computing further. Government blueprints have already been published which indicated that the cloud is meant within the future to supply services to government departments, citizens, and businesses throughout India, which cloud-based mobile connectivity also will be prioritised also.

The growth of cloud computing in India is indicative of the importance that's being placed on the cloud within the so-called developing economies. cloud technology  India is a component of the collective referred to as the BRICS nations – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa – which it's predicted will wield great economic and political power within the coming decades, or possibly sooner. China and India alone house 37% of the world’s population, and there are many other demographic factors that point to the rising power and importance of those nations within the almost mid-term future.

As cloud computing increasingly established itself as a mainstream technology, it's getting to be vital for the technology to be embraced by every significant geographical area of the planet. With both China and India showing a transparent enthusiasm for the cloud, one is often certain that this coming power block has truly embraced the cloud revolution.


Our Enterprise App Stores an important ingredient for any successful BYOD strategy?

Rick Delgado’s recent Compare the Cloud article a few subjects gaining tons of traction at the instant, Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), raised some interesting questions on the realities of implementing such a policy. Just where do the private and therefore the professional overlap? And what're the simplest thanks to police this border territory?

Could Enterprise App Stores be how of managing the overlap? And, if so, who stands to gain?

The “Store-Ship Enterprise”

A recent Gartner report predicted that by 2017 25 percent of enterprises would have Enterprise App Stores where workers can browse and download apps to their computers and mobile devices. it's argued that they provide an economical and faster way of distributing Apps to finish users and, crucially, of managing the Apps that users chose to put in on their devices.

Could Enterprise App Stores be how of managing the overlap? And, if so, who stands to gain?

It is this second point that would make an Enterprise App Store attractive to any organization considering a BYOD policy. By encouraging end users to stay to a narrow range of approved Apps, it shifts some control back to the hands of IT. If successfully implemented and widely adopted, it could go how to alleviating the twin risks that a BYOD policy may represent. Namely: what are the users installing and taking into the organization? And: what are they taking out?

The Perception of Greater Risk

By encouraging end-users to stay to a narrow range of approved Apps, it shifts some control back to the hands of IT.

Of course, these risks exist for any organization, and in some ways, a BYOD strategy requires nothing quite the management of a fleet of mobile devices – something any organization is doing already. The difference, of course, lies within the fact this fleet is not any longer homogeneous; it consists of an enormous range of devices, platforms, OS, and software all running all types of version numbers.

Plus, because the devices are seen as personal devices by the top user, end users are far more willing and certain to put in Apps that fall outside corporate guidelines and policies.


A report conducted by Frost & Sullivan for McAfee recently reported within the Register, found that quite 80% of surveyed staff (in both IT and line of business) were using a minimum of 1 non-approved SaaS application. The authors suggest it's likely that quite a 3rd of all software within organizations has been installed and used without IT oversight.

It is the fear of this tide of ‘shadow IT’ that underwrites much of the business nervousness about BYOD strategies. And yet the one thing this survey makes clear is that this isn’t a BYOD issue. Shadow it's happening anyway; with or without BYOD policies being formally in situ.

My experience tells me that, in fact, it isn’t just shadowing IT that's happening anyway, without a proper BYOD strategy being in place: BYOD is occurring anyway.


Canute-like Strategies

Resisting BYOD may be a little like setting one’s throne at the water’s edge. Organizations got to manage the complexities of this developing reality, which is about to be further complicated as wearable devices begin.

Given this complexity and therefore the ‘on the ground’ reality, Mobile Device Management (MDM) systems begin to form sense. And an Enterprise App Store is that the carrot accompanying the MDM stick.

Using an Enterprise App Store within a BYOD strategy isn't such a lot about stopping the horse from bolting, but rather offering Dobbin some nice green pasture within the hope he doesn’t make an opportunity for it and take a number of the fence with him.

The Audacity of Hope

The success of Apple’s App Store and Google Play has encouraged non-IT people to put in and manage applications on their devices in away most people couldn’t have predicted 10 years ago. This does present issues for IT, but using the very tools that are driving these risks to limit those self same risks looks like a wise plan.

The Enterprise App Store offers a chance for IT to approve and package up tools for BYOD end-users during a way that both enables them to make sure that the Apps are secure and managed and offers a chance to manage to license and buying agreements during a more coherent fashion. The staff has clear guidelines about which tools they ought to be using that task; enabling better collaboration within the organization and (hopefully) ensuring they suit organizational standards.

‘Hopefully’ is that the keyword here: because, while an honest Enterprise App Store will enable end-users to try to do everything, it doesn’t prevent them from doing anything.

The Threat to Traditional Software Vendors

The key to success is going to be populating the App Stores with the tools that end-users want to use in order that they're encouraged to use the Enterprise App Store route, and refreshing content regularly enough to stop them straying.

This means populating the App Stores not only with Enterprise solutions, but also the approved SaaS solutions with which users are familiar; everything they have to try to their job. It seems such a practical approach that Gartner’s prediction of 25 percent seems low to me.

But the most important winner from this seemingly inexorable shift has got to be the SaaS vendors.

The fast implementation times make Cloud-based management tools and Enterprise App Stores a beautiful proposition. But the most important winner from this seemingly inexorable shift has got to be the SaaS vendors. While ‘thin client’ access to the Enterprise systems could be one solution, it's likely that organizations are going to be tempted quite ever to seem more towards the SaaS model.

Enterprise App Stores vital for BYOD?

Rick Delgado’s recent Compare the Cloud article a few subjects gaining tons of traction at the instant, Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), raised some interesting questions on the realities of implementing such a policy.

Just where do the private and therefore the professional overlap? And what're the simplest thanks to police this border territory? Could Enterprise App Stores be how of managing the overlap? And, if so, who stands to gain?

The “Store-Ship Enterprise”

A recent Gartner report predicted that by 2017 25 percent of enterprises would have Enterprise App Stores where workers can browse and download apps to their computers and mobile devices. it's argued that they provide an economical and faster way of distributing Apps to finish users and, crucially, of managing the Apps that users chose to put in on their devices.

It is this second point that would make an Enterprise App Store attractive to any organization considering a BYOD policy. By encouraging end-users to stay to a narrow range of approved Apps, it shifts some control back to the hands of IT. If successfully implemented and widely adopted, it could go how to alleviating the twin risks that a BYOD policy may represent. Namely: what are the users installing and taking into the organization? And: what are they taking out?

Encouraging end users to stay to a narrow range of approved Apps, it shifts control back to the hands of IT. The Perception of Greater Risk

Of course, these risks exist for any orga

nization, and in some ways, a BYOD strategy requires nothing quite the management of a fleet of mobile devices – something any organization is doing already. The difference, of course, lies within the fact this fleet is not any longer homogeneous; it consists of an enormous range of devices, platforms, OS, and software all running all types of version numbers.

Plus, because the devices are seen as personal devices by the top user, end users are far more willing and certain to put in Apps that fall outside corporate guidelines and policies.

A report conducted by Frost & Sullivan for McAfee recently reported within the Register, found that quite 80% of surveyed staff (in both IT and line of business) were using a minimum of 1 non-approved SaaS application. The authors suggest it's likely that quite a 3rd of all software within organizations has been installed and used without IT oversight.

It is the fear of this tide of ‘shadow IT’ that underwrites much of the business nervousness about BYOD strategies. And yet the one thing this survey makes clear is that this isn’t a BYOD issue. Shadow it's happening anyway.

It is the fear of this tide of ‘shadow IT’ that underwrites much of the business nervousness about BYOD strategies. And yet the one thing this survey makes clear is that this isn’t a BYOD issue. Shadow it's happening anyway; with or without BYOD policies being formally in situ.

My experience tells me that, in fact, it isn’t just shadowed IT that's happening anyway, without a proper BYOD strategy being in place: BYOD is occurring anyway.


Canute-like Strategies

Resisting BYOD may be a little like setting one’s throne at the water’s edge. Organizations got to manage the complexities of this developing reality, which is about to be further complicated as wearable devices begin.

Given this complexity and therefore the ‘on the ground’ reality, Mobile Device Management (MDM) systems begin to form sense. And an Enterprise App Store is that the carrot accompanying the MDM stick.

Using an Enterprise App Store within a BYOD strategy isn't such a lot about stopping the horse from bolting, but rather offering Dobbin some nice green pasture within the hope he doesn’t make an opportunity for it and take a number of the fence with him.

Using an Enterprise App Store within a BYOD strategy isn't such a lot about stopping the horse from bolting, but rather offering Dobbin some nice green pasture within the hope he doesn’t make an opportunity for it.


The Audacity of Hope

The success of Apple’s App Store and Google Play has encouraged non-IT people to put in and manage applications on their devices in a way most people couldn’t have predicted 10 years ago. This does present issues for IT, but using the very tools that are driving these risks to limit those self-same risks looks like a wise plan.

The Enterprise App Store offers a chance for IT to approve and package up tools for BYOD end-users in a way that both enables them to make sure that the Apps are secure and managed and offers a chance to manage to license and buying agreements during a more coherent fashion. The staff has clear guidelines about which tools they ought to be using that task; enabling better collaboration within the organization and (hopefully) ensuring they suit organizational standards.

Hopefully’ is that the keyword here: because, while an honest Enterprise App Store will enable end-users to try to do everything, it doesn’t prevent them from doing anything.


The Threat to Traditional Software Vendors

The key to success is going to be populating the App Stores with the tools that end-users want to use in order that they're encouraged to use the Enterprise App Store route, and refreshing content regularly enough to stop them straying.

This means populating the App Stores not only with Enterprise solutions, but also the approved SaaS solutions with which users are familiar; everything they have to try to their job. It seems such a practical approach that Gartner’s prediction of 25 percent seems low to me.

The biggest winner from this seemingly inexorable shift has got to be the SaaS vendors.

The fast implementation times make Cloud-based management tools and Enterprise App Stores a beautiful proposition. But the most important winner from this seemingly inexorable shift has got to be the SaaS vendors. While ‘thin client’ access to the Enterprise systems could be one solution, it's likely that organizations are going to be tempted quite ever to seem more towards the SaaS model.

Enterprise App Stores vital for BYOD?

Rick Delgado’s recent Compare the Cloud article a few subjects gaining tons of traction at the instant, Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), raised some interesting questions on the realities of implementing such a policy.

Just where do the private and therefore the professional overlap? And what're the simplest thanks to police this border territory? Could Enterprise App Stores be how of managing the overlap? And, if so, who stands to gain?

The “Store-Ship Enterprise”

A recent Gartner report predicted that by 2017 25 percent of enterprises would have Enterprise App Stores where workers can browse and download apps to their computers and mobile devices. it's argued that they provide an economical and faster way of distributing Apps to finish users and, crucially, of managing the Apps that users chose to put in on their devices.

It is this second point that would make an Enterprise App Store attractive to any organization considering a BYOD policy. By encouraging end-users to stay to a narrow range of approved Apps, it shifts some control back to the hands of IT. If successfully implemented and widely adopted, it could go how to alleviating the twin risks that a BYOD policy may represent. Namely: what are the users installing and taking into the organization? And: what are they taking out?

Encouraging end users to stay to a narrow range of approved Apps, it shifts control back to the hands of IT.

The Perception of Greater Risk

Of course, these risks exist for any organization, and in some ways, a BYOD strategy requires nothing quite the management of a fleet of mobile devices – something any organization is doing already. The difference, of course, lies within the fact this fleet is not any longer homogeneous; it consists of an enormous range of devices, platforms, OS, and software all running all types of version numbers.

Plus, because the devices are seen as personal devices by the top user, end users are far more willing and certain to put in Apps that fall outside corporate guidelines and policies.

A report conducted by Frost & Sullivan for McAfee recently reported within the Register, found that quite 80% of surveyed staff (in both IT and line of business) were using a minimum of 1 non-approved SaaS application. The authors suggest it's likely that quite a 3rd of all software within organizations has been installed and used without IT oversight.

It is the fear of this tide of ‘shadow IT’ that underwrites much of the business nervousness about BYOD strategies. And yet the one thing this survey makes clear is that this isn’t a BYOD issue. Shadow it's happening anyway.

It is the fear of this tide of ‘shadow IT’ that underwrites much of the business nervousness about BYOD strategies. And yet the one thing this survey makes clear is that this isn’t a BYOD issue. Shadow it's happening anyway; with or without BYOD policies being formally in situ.

My experience tells me that, in fact, it isn’t just shadowed IT that's happening anyway, without a proper BYOD strategy being in place: BYOD is occurring anyway.

Canute-like Strategies

Resisting BYOD may be a little like setting one’s throne at the water’s edge. Organizations got to manage the complexities of this developing reality, which is about to be further complicated as wearable devices begin.

Given this complexity and therefore the ‘on the ground’ reality, Mobile Device Management (MDM) systems begin to form sense. And an Enterprise App Store is that the carrot accompanying the MDM stick.

Using an Enterprise App Store within a BYOD strategy isn't such a lot about stopping the horse from bolting, but rather offering Dobbin some nice green pasture within the hope he doesn’t make an opportunity for it and take a number of the fence with him.

Using an Enterprise App Store within a BYOD strategy isn't such a lot about stopping the horse from bolting, but rather offering Dobbin some nice green pasture within the hope he doesn’t make an opportunity for it.

The Audacity of Hope

The success of Apple’s App Store and Google Play has encouraged non-IT people to put in and manage applications on their devices in a way most people couldn’t have predicted 10 years ago. This does present issues for IT, but using the very tools that are driving these risks to limit those self-same risks looks like a wise plan.

The Enterprise App Store offers a chance for IT to approve and package up tools for BYOD end users in a way that both enables them to make sure that the Apps are secure and managed and offers a chance to manage to license and buying agreements during a more coherent fashion. The staff has clear guidelines about which tools they ought to be using that task; enabling better collaboration within the organization and (hopefully) ensuring they suit organizational standards.

Hopefully’ is that the keyword here: because, while an honest Enterprise App Store will enable end-users to try to do everything, it doesn’t prevent them from doing anything.

The Threat to Traditional Software Vendors

The key to success is going to be populating the App Stores with the tools that end-users want to use in order that they're encouraged to use the Enterprise App Store route, and refreshing content regularly enough to stop them straying.