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IBM and SAP: For systems integration within the fast lane

As SAP systems integrators, you’ll likely be conscious of the longstanding partnership between IBM and SAP.information technology colleges for many years the 2 companies have worked together to deliver collaborative IT solutions that are cost-effective, reliable and deliver A level of performance that permits businesses to outpace their rivals. When it involves systems integration, you can’t afford to be slapdash, but neither are you able to afford to waste time, particularly when new business challenges and opportunities are emerging all the time.
It’s for these reasons that we’re delighted to announce that the SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud solution is now available across IBM Cloud, bringing together two of the technology industry’s major players another time. For us, the importance of delivering SAP businesses solutions securely, but swiftly, has never been greater – ensuring systems integration remains firmly within the fast lane.
The first speed boost we are giving to SAP systems integrators is SAP Hana on Power8. IBM Power Systems is meant to capture and process huge swathes of knowledge from a mess of sources, enabling organisations to deliver cutting-edge insights. In fact, both SAP and IBM customers are bound to enjoy the mixture of the former’s strategic in-memory database and therefore the latter’s Big Data platform. Power Systems users are going to be ready to analyse information in real-time, without having to modify SAP workloads to a separate platform and SAP HANA users are going to be ready to deliver their application and workloads with greater reliability and availability than ever before, because of the increased performance and scalability of the Power8 platform. 
IBM Power Systems is meant to capture and process huge swathes of data IBM has worked hard to enable SAP HANA customers to start on the Power8 platform as quickly as possible. IBM Solution Edition may be a fast-start option that gives three base configurations to enable rapid HANA deployments on the facility server, with customers also given the choice of running extra virtualised workloads and adding capacity as and once they need it. IBM Power users that are working with non-HANA SAP workloads also will be ready to realise the advantages of SAP Hana on Power in no time. In most cases, customers are going to be ready to leverage existing processes, meaning that new procedures won't be necessary and SAP systems integrators can really hit the group running.
Automated Modular Management (AMM) is another IBM solution that brings industry-leading automation and integration to SAP customers. AMM for SAP HANA may be a subscription service offering with monthly payments options and hosted on Softlayer. It enables businesses to manage their cloud infrastructure simply and quickly by bringing greater automation to their IT resources. Developers can build and deploy applications using the SAP management console and SAP HANA Studio. Plus, AMM for SAP HANA utilises pre-deployed infrastructure and fully automated software installation.
the flexibility of IBM Cloud, combined with the SAP HANA database, enables organisations to get real-time insights
What’s more, the pliability of IBM Cloud, combined with the SAP HANA database, enables organisations to get real-time insights that would help them deliver faster business processes or cement customer relationships. Real-time analytics is vitally important within the agile business world of today because delivering solutions faster than your competitors isn’t almost raw speed, it’s also about rapid changes of direction to satisfy new challenges. Up-to-date analytics enables businesses to truly pre-empt trends and react beforehand.
Whichever industry you're employed in, outpacing your competitors is significant, but there’s no point in racing to the finishing line if you’ve lost all of your supporters. With IBM and SAP’s latest collaborations, it’s all about less haste and more speed. Automation is a significant component of this, removing the manual tasks that take up such a lot of some time, but without diminishing reliability or performance. Similarly, getting started with SAP HANA on Power8 and AMM for SAP HANA has been made as straightforward as possible, so you'll begin immediately developing new solutions, bringing more customers to the cloud and integrating mission-critical applications.


How Big Data Is Changing Ecommerce beyond Recognition?

Data is practically everywhere and that we are already won't to it. With constant contribution from diverse interfaces, volumes of digital data are opening new vistas of opportunities for each facet of life. within the retail industry, particularly the booming online retail sector, this alteration is most blatant. Experts say that big data is that the new horizon with an awesome volume of digital data likely to possess the relevant solutions to an array of issues and problems within the retail sector. 
On the opposite hand, the success of the web mercantile establishment or eCommerce site refers to the number of buyers or the gross amount of transaction during a given time. to spice up these numbers tracking buyers, and their behaviours, and accordingly spotting new opportunities for sales is vital . Understanding site visitors and knowing what triggers them towards making purchases are often best done by analysing the traffic data. This intensive analytic process that deciphers a big selection of useful insights is referred to as big data and has seminal importance in business conversion for the eCommerce sites.
How Big Data is represented in the eCommerce realm? 
Big data in its quintessential definition encompasses a broad spectrum of data useful to retailers whether over web store or in-store. Big data within the realm of eCommerce is represented in 3 characteristics of knowledge, respectively as velocity, volume, and variety.
eCommerce Big data is represented as velocity, volume, and sort of DATA
The velocity of knowledge represents the info speed like transactions, user actions, etc.
The volume of knowledge represents the amount of knowledge from diverse sources represented in the denomination of volumes like TB, PB and ZBs.
Variety of data represents multiple types, sources and formats of knowledge.

The ways Big Data changing eCommerce

While many of us even after having a thought of the supposedly ‘Big’ role of massive Data in digital interfaces, aren't entirely sure during which ways this will play an important role for his or her business. Big Data regardless of the hype it received in recent years isn't something which will be overshadowed quickly by another technology so soon. Any business, no matter their size, must take the opportunities or a minimum of inherit terms with the scope offered by the large volume of digital data and therefore the analytical tools to affect them. in additional ways than one, the potential of massive Data is often incorporated to the benefits of companies. 

1. Customisation

As the huge volume of customer data is being collected through various digital sources including loyalty programs, browsing patterns of the web site visitors, and buy history and behaviour of past users, now retailers have the chance to process this huge volume of data for planning a customized approach for various segments of consumers as per the insights gained supported this volume of customer data.

2. Customer-specific offering

As a retailer once you have a comparatively accurate customer profile you'll address his concerns, wants and sensitivity better with specific offers. Now creating more accurate customer profile is additionally easier as you've got diverse touchpoints and sources for collecting and processing customer data. Once you've got specific customer profile this will guide you'll regarding the worth and promotional offers that are likely to re-engage the customer and may convince him to a buying decision once more. Across the retail stores, this has already been proven together of the foremost effective customer retention strategies, since with this one can more accurately decide the discount, price and offers applicable for every potential customer and targeted buying decision. 

3. Making customer service better

Do you know that a whopping 68% of web traffic simply leaves due to non-satisfactory customer service? Customer service has always been the foremost neglected area in most web retail stores regardless of knowing the critical role it plays in boosting sales and customer engagement. By facilitating coordination and communication among various channels of data flow including emails, phone calls, forum posts, live chat messages and typical web behaviours Big Data can help to make customer service more interactive, time-pressed and purpose-driven. Understanding of issues concerning customers and addressing concerns during a time-bound manner can only be done by allocating resources to understand the loopholes in the communication of channels. Any conflict of interest, delay and non-addressing of issues thus are often better tacked with the assistance of accessing of digital customer data in real-time.

4. Smooth operation and provide chain management

For any eCommerce business transparency operational and well-defined process in supply chain management plays a crucial role. information technology consulting during this respect Big Data can play a really prominent role as by accessing and analysing the huge volume of operational data and customer data it can accurately forecast all possible glitches and disruptions within the process and thus can prevent delay, disturbance and process leaks. By accessing data on warehousing, shipping and other operational procedure and updates in real-time and by communicating an equivalent to the retailer any disruption and delay in the business process are often avoided. Top tips for ensuring a smooth data centre migration to the Cloud
As the demands placed on data centres intensify, more quality cloud-based solutions emerge. this suggests Data Centre Migration to the cloud, is becoming an increasingly unavoidable consideration for IT managers. Although a posh undertaking, the efficiency benefits further down the road can often justify the time, effort and capital required.
Migration to the cloud can take several forms: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS). IaaS involves substituting servers in your data centre for servers within the Cloud. The leading providers of those sorts of services are Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, though a plethora of local data centres provides similar, albeit somewhat less scalable services. SaaS, of which Salesforce is perhaps the foremost well-known, is at the opposite end of the size to IaaS, whereas PaaS, like Amazon Elastic Cloud, Force.com (by Salesforce) and Azure web platform, sits in-between these two approaches.
Managing your own data centres allows you to stay in complete control
Managing your own data centres allows you to stay in complete control, but are often very costly. For this reason, many have decided to seem at migrating some or all of the hosting from their own data centres to the cloud. However, this does mean entrusting your data and a few or all of your operations to a 3rd party. What happens if there's a security breach, data loss or an outage? These issues boil right down to two questions; does one trust the third party, and if you are doing, will your regulatory environment allow you to entrust your data and operations to them?
Once a choice has been taken to migrate to the Cloud, it's important that you simply plan thoroughly and stick with a transparent and thought-out structure. Here are some tips to assist ensure your Data Centre Migration to the Cloud flows well:


1) Consider the risks and the way you're getting to manage them


Generally, the most risks during a Data Centre Migration are loss of knowledge and unplanned periods of downtime. Risks can generally be mitigated by performing trial migrations and testing the relevant applications after the trial migration. More testing incurs greater costs, however, and a balance may need to be struck between the risks avoided by thorough testing and therefore the cost of the testing. Classifying applications by business criticality and therefore the technical difficulty of migrating them can save time and ensure consistency during this decoding process.


2) Identify potential incompatibility issues


Legacy apps often don't translate into new environments thanks to not having the proper operating systems and hardware – IaaS doesn't normally include the older operating systems which have legacy hardware. There are two ways of handling this issue: either finding how to run the legacy application on modern hardware, which either requires emulating legacy hardware or replacing the legacy application with a more modern one with similar functionality. The new application may even be SaaS, which might eliminate infrastructure concerns after migration. Replacing the appliance may be a project in its title and should accompany extensive licensing, integration and training costs, but such an exercise could also be necessary anyway, and doing it as a part of the migration are often cheaper than performing the migration then replacing the appliance a brief time later.


3) Check the network you're migrating to are often configured to run your apps


During a knowledge Centre Migration, you'll be migrating multiple applications which currently exist within a network configured to a particular spec. For IaaS migrations, if the new network doesn't add an identical thanks to the present one, the migration will need to take this under consideration or the applications won't function correctly after migration. to assist avoid issues like this, confirm that you simply fully understand your current data centre network infrastructure, considering elements like firewalls, domains and trusts and make sure that you're given an honest understanding of the one you're moving to. If the IaaS doesn't permit the specified settings, adjustments must be made to the applications to permit them to figure within the constraints of the IaaS.
make sure that you simply fully understand your current data centre network infrastructure


4) Consider network latency

It is likely that Cloud-based infrastructure is going to be physically further faraway from your users than your data centre was. fairly often, a standard data centre is on an equivalent site because the users of the applications it hosts. Cloud infrastructure could also be thousands of miles away. for several applications, especially those with a browser-based architecture, this may not be a drag. for a few applications, especially older ones, a rise in network latency can cause a serious drop by performance. To counter this, the appliance can either get replaced by a more modern one, be hosted on a skinny client system like Citrix XenApp, or be redesigned to figure better with higher latency.

5) mention the discovery

Depending on how long the first Data Centre has been up and running, there could also be existing applications which have outlived the presence of the workers that set them up within the first place. it's very feasible that the knowledge of how exactly these applications work and even the actual fact that they exist left your company with those staff members.
If you're considering the migration of a whole data centre, it's crucial to understand fully what's hosted within the data centre and the way each application interacts with others. Lack of awareness about this will end in lost functionality and potential loss of business-critical data. Network tracing and discovery tools are often wont to analyse systems over time and re-discover any forgotten components and relationships.
The main risks during migration remain unplanned downtime and loss of knowledge. Those technical risks are complemented by the risks of unforeseen delay and price, caused by such factors as migrated applications failing tests before going live. To mitigate these risks, a strictly structured and planned approach is important.
As the demands placed on data centres intensify, more quality cloud-based solutions emerge. this suggests Data Centre Migration to the cloud, is becoming an increasingly unavoidable consideration for IT managers. Although a posh undertaking, the efficiency benefits further down the road can often justify the time, effort and capital required.
Migration to the cloud can take several forms: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS). IaaS involves substituting servers in your data centre for servers within the Cloud. The leading providers of those sorts of services are Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, though a plethora of local data centres provides similar, albeit somewhat less scalable services. SaaS, of which Salesforce is perhaps the foremost well-known, is at the opposite end of the size to IaaS, whereas PaaS, like Amazon Elastic Cloud, Force.com (by Salesforce) and Azure web platform, sits in-between these two approaches.
Managing your own data centres allows you to stay in complete control
Managing your own data centres allows you to stay in complete control, but are often very costly. For this reason, many have decided to seem at migrating some or all of the hosting from their own data centres to the cloud. However, this does mean entrusting your data and a few or all of your operations to a 3rd party. What happens if there's a security breach, data loss or an outage? These issues boil right down to two questions; does one trust the third party, and if you are doing, will your regulatory environment allow you to entrust your data and operations to them?
Once a choice has been taken to migrate to the Cloud, it's important that you simply plan thoroughly and stick with a transparent and thought-out structure. Here are some tips to assist ensure your Data Centre Migration to the Cloud flows well:


1) Consider the risks and the way you're getting to manage them


Generally, the most risks during a Data Centre Migration are loss of knowledge and unplanned periods of downtime. Risks can generally be mitigated by performing trial migrations and testing the relevant applications after the trial migration. More testing incurs greater costs, however, and a balance may need to be struck between the risks avoided by thorough testing and therefore the cost of the testing. Classifying applications by business criticality and therefore the technical difficulty of migrating them can save time and ensure consistency during this decoding process.


2) Identify potential incompatibility issues


Legacy apps often don't translate into new environments thanks to not having the proper operating systems and hardware – IaaS doesn't normally include the older operating systems which have legacy hardware. There are two ways of handling this issue: either finding how to run the legacy application on modern hardware, which either requires emulating legacy hardware or replacing the legacy application with a more modern one with similar functionality. The new application may even be SaaS, which might eliminate infrastructure concerns after migration. Replacing the appliance may be a project in its title and should accompany extensive licensing, integration and training costs, but such an exercise could also be necessary anyway, and doing it as a part of the migration are often cheaper than performing the migration then replacing the appliance a brief time later.


3) Check the network you're migrating to are often configured to run your apps


During a knowledge Centre Migration, you'll be migrating multiple applications which currently exist within a network configured to a particular spec. For IaaS migrations, if the new network doesn't add an identical thanks to the present one, the migration will need to take this under consideration or the applications won't function correctly after migration.information technology education to assist avoid issues like this, confirm that you simply fully understand your current data centre network infrastructure, considering elements like firewalls, domains and trusts and make sure that you're given an honest understanding of the one you're moving to. If the IaaS doesn't permit the specified settings, adjustments must be made to the applications to permit them to figure within the constraints of the IaaS.

make sure that you simply fully understand your current data centre network infrastructure


4) Consider network latency


It is likely that Cloud-based infrastructure is going to be physically further faraway from your users than your data centre was. fairly often, a standard data centre is on an equivalent site because the users of the applications it hosts. Cloud infrastructure could also be thousands of miles away. for several applications, especially those with a browser-based architecture, this may not be a drag. for a few applications, especially older ones, a rise in network latency can cause a serious drop by performance. To counter this, the appliance can either get replaced by a more modern one, be hosted on a skinny client system like Citrix XenApp, or be redesigned to figure better with higher latency.


5) mention the discovery


Depending on how long the first Data Centre has been up and running, there could also be existing applications which have outlived the presence of the workers that set them up within the first place. it's very feasible that the knowledge of how exactly these applications work and even the actual fact that they exist left your company with those staff members.