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Why performance versus promise matters within the cloud world



Industry analysts project that global software-as-a-service (SaaS) spending will still grow, from $49 billion in 2015 to $67 billion in 2018. IDC research supports this, suggesting that SaaS revenues are growing nearly five times faster than traditional software products. With this in mind, cloud really is now a reality for businesses today. And, as more companies come to trust and depend on the cloud, many are increasingly focusing their attention on requirements like service availability and performance.

After all, modern enterprises believe the cloud for his or her most crucial business systems, so it’s absolutely imperative that these applications are available and may be scaled up or down as required . This reliability builds trust, and thereupon trust comes a relationship between vendor and customer which will become a long-term engagement. Equally important, from a vendor perspective, is that trust helps inspire customer satisfaction, which is that the critical metric for fulfillment within the cloud world.

As more business applications move to a multi-tenant cloud deployment model, software vendors are being challenged to satisfy their entire customer base with one service-level agreement (SLA). Consumers became familiar with the user experience provided by companies like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn—services that rarely have any downtime longer than a browser refresh. Although some service interruptions are necessary and even mandatory—such as for major version updates—the expectation exists that they ought to be brief and unobtrusive.

As well as having seamless availability, customers also want their applications to remain up-to-date and historically this meant systems had to be pack up by vendors during updates. The headaches related to major upgrades of on-premise systems can leave customers months out-of-date in terms of maintenance updates, and with some vendors, there's a patchwork of service packs and bolt-on products to make sure users have the newest features. Extended downtime and an almost perpetual state of running yesterday’s version isn’t a recipe for keeping customers happy.

It’s at this junction of availability, reliability, and running the newest system that the journey to zero downtime really becomes important. Service availability in today’s connected, always-on world may be a whole different ball game to the legacy client/server world. within the cloud computing era, the responsibility for uptime and availability falls on the supplier’s shoulders.

So what should a best practice approach look like? one , workable SLA is very desirable, which approach should mesh with the way companies believe the planning and delivery of the merchandise – with an ultimate aim of achieving one code line, one version, and one customer community. Customers should have the chance to preview new releases before they are going live, in order that they enjoy testing and planning that takes place during this period. This brave new world is extremely different to the on-premise ERP upgrade experience, which normally requires months of designing and weeks of post-rollout fixes.

As more businesses shift to the cloud, questions also are being asked about the transparency of SLAs. does one know the specifics of your SLA? Are there any clauses in your contract that allow unscheduled downtime and still allow the seller to satisfy the agreed-upon SLA? Any lack of transparency around SLAs are some things customers should avoid.

That said, customers shouldn’t be thinking solely about the SLA promise once they check out the cloud, but more their chosen vendor’s past performance and, consequently, how successful they're going to be as a future partner to the business.

In the cloud world, vendors must continually earn the customer’s trust if they need to increase the connection long-term, because with a subscription model, the customer truly is on top of things . For this reason, it really is performance instead of promises that matters for businesses moving to the cloud today.



Understanding the new era of Internet governance


Henry Ford is reported to possess observed that “If I had asked people what they wanted, they might have said faster horses”. Short enough to be popular on social media, this homage to leadership is as likely to be wont to damn ‘luddite’ dissenters today as at any time in history.

Yet whatever logic the old saying has when applied to genuinely revolutionary creations, the thought that leaders have monopolies on the simplest ideas, and thus that they will and in some cases should bypass public opinion , isn't without controversy. this is often particularly true where decisions are susceptible to erode those rights which are so fundamental to our daily lives that we simply take them without any consideration . we frequently see this tension within the development of digital media services, where new opportunities are purchased by revising our social and cultural foundations, or a minimum of our assumptions about the extent of these foundations.

Ongoing discussions within ICANN, the organisation that controls the name system, are putting a contemporary face on this value exchange. With historically low barriers to entry, the name system, and especially the new top-level domains (TLDs) like , offers new ways of conducting business and of expressing an opinion. But because the name system has grown in size and in importance, it's enabled a volume and variety of privacy and property infringements that might never be experienced offline.

Freedom of expression may be a fundamental right, of course; but so too are the rights to respect for personal life and to property, including property . Can these competing interests tend equal protection, or must one cede to the others? How, and by whom, should the balance be determined? Through the creation of bespoke rights protection mechanisms (RPMs), several TLD operators are taking the initiative to work out where the balance lies within their own domain spaces, but the absence of a worldwide solution to expressive-but-infringing content across all top-level domains means in practice many stakeholders remain with none remedy or protection against abusive behaviour. So, what to do?

Recent history shows how a worldwide solution might be achieved. In 1999 the worldwide Internet community created a coffee cost, accessible and, most significantly , supranational means of tackling cybersquatting and typo-squatting in domain names that also preserved Internet users’ rights to freedom of expression. As a results of contributions from stakeholders representing all aspects of the name system, the community created the Uniform name Dispute Resolution Policy (“UDRP”), an administrative procedure to which those selling domain names must now adhere so as to suits their contractual obligations to ICANN.

The UDRP has been an enormous success. It provides certainty to rightsholders and registrants alike, and it means disputes are often resolved without costly litigation and potentially life-changing damages or cost awards being made against a losing party. alittle number of interest groups want ICANN to reduce the UDRP as a part of its ongoing RPM review, but those groups haven't offered any compelling alternative. In fact, not only has the worldwide Internet community benefitted from the steadiness and predictability of the UDRP, but it's appropriate within the context of ICANN’s RPM review to think about whether the model of the UDRP might offer an answer to the problems raised above, and will be extended to deal with quite just the utilization of trade marks in domain names. there's little question that a collective process like that which created the UDRP would allow any proposed solutions to draw on the experience and perspectives of the disparate interest groups within the web community. That it might end in a globally-binding solution that might create A level playing field and will not be altered by mere bilateral agreement also favours this approach.

As shown by the steps taken by individual registry operators to develop their own RPMs, a replacement era of Internet governance is coming: the question that is still is what is going to it look like? Should conduct and content be regulated by bespoke solutions developed by commercial service providers, by minimum standards began by governments on behalf of their citizenry, by detailed rules prescribed by the worldwide Internet community, or by another means?

There are some ways for the community to urge involved during this debate, from attending ICANN meetings, to joining a list via http://icann.org, to liaising with technology and disputes lawyers conversant in ICANN. But regardless of the method you employ to possess your say, the time to urge involved is now.In today’s cloud era, the Chief Customer Officer has never been more vital

We’ve been living during a cloud era for a few time now and have watched its impact in transforming businesses, but what does it mean for customer service? Higher demands from customers have resulted during a new strategic role within organisations – the Chief Customer Officer. What does that role got to deliver in today’s cloud era to impact on company success?


Cloud and customer expectations

The dominance of cloud has heavily impacted customer expectations. As consumers, we've all become wont to having information available at our fingertips, whenever we would like it, wherever we are and however we would like to consume it. Forrester notes that “As customers become more familiar with digital touchpoints, their expectations increase.” this is often very true for newer generations, now born into a digital world.

It’s no different within the business world when serving an ever-growing digital generation. consistent with Forrester, “Millennials are getting the most important demographic group in your workforce. Their experience with digital technology shapes their expectations of and behavior within the workplace. They expect and wish high-quality technologies and simply consumable technology services that enable them to succeed.”

Forrester cites that we are now within the “age of the customer”. it's therefore time to prioritise people who have the foremost impact on a business – the customer. Customers expect the simplest service, products and knowledge and there's no reason for companies to fail in delivery. Again, like consumers, customers expect an equivalent level of service whenever and wherever they're and during a way they need to receive it. the great news is that the technology is there to assist , with cloud ERP eliminating friction and errors when handling customer facing processes to make satisfying experiences for everybody involved.


Introducing the Chief Customer Officer

With customer complacency now gone, customer loyalty is far harder to realize . because the cloud era gains more dominance and therefore the customer has become king, it's no surprise to ascertain an increase during a new role – Chief Customer Officer (CCO). This role is significant in ensuring companies remain competitive. The CCO has got to look both internally and externally to form sure the proper teams, technology, policies and processes are in situ to supply second-to-none customer service which it's felt by each and each customer.

Customer relationships have also been changing. not are they built on one-off transactions. Customer service is now liable for building long-term real relationships where every customer touch with a corporation is straightforward , enjoyable and valuable. it's only then when customer loyalty are often created. No-one expects a totally perfect service all of the time, but it's how companies interact in good times and bad, that also helps to formulate a robust relationship and one which can reap benefits within the long-term for both parties as they join .

A CCO must add tandem with all departments of a business, both back and front office, to make sure a customer features a smooth interaction. whether or not they want to shop for more, get advice, check status or maybe complain – each connection should be received with an equivalent level of enthusiasm, professionalism, consistency and accuracy, leading to strong customer satisfaction.


Impact of technology

Cloud technology, if implemented with the proper strategy, can impact dramatically on how a CCO can succeed. If each and each person during a company is in a position to ascertain an entire 360 degree customer view, the probabilities of excellence in customer service delivery are significantly improved. If anyone can view data from sales, finance, HR and services in one true customer record it provides great insight to offer more understanding of a customer, and what's needed to serve that customer well. It’s not enough to patch together different cloud apps, as which will still end in siloed information between departments resulting in a scarcity of consistency in how customers are served. To share data across all departments within the easiest method all cloud applications should get on an equivalent platform. Not all CCOs will have direct deciding when it involves technology, but the foremost savvy will ensure they need influence and therefore the absolute best opportunity to achieve exemplary customer service delivery.

The digital age has increased competition overall. Forrester states that “competition is increasingly supported the strength of your digital experiences and digital business. At an equivalent time, your customers’ expectations are formed by their best experiences in any industry.” Without a robust customer-centric position, a corporation can sit back as dissatisfaction is communicated publicly and quickly and a customer moves on to a different provider. Having a CCO in situ can make sure that customer-centricity remains a priority for all.


Customer service shift

Expectations driven within the cloud era mean that customers expect companies to make relationships with them. For too long many have rallied around to undertake and problem solve with those customers who aren't happy and not receiving the service they believe they need signed up for. A successful CCO will make sure the right touch points are in situ to still build relationships with satisfied and dissatisfied customers. This reduces attrition, increases retention and greatly improves the likelihood of cross-selling. Not only that, but it can help a corporation build fantastic references. Third party endorsement is simpler for others to look at and has more credibility than ever before.


The cloud era is about to remain , customer demand will still increase and therefore the CCO role is about to continue its rise. It’s a busy role, but vital for those companies who wish to win through during a digital age where companies must centre everything they are doing round the most vital party – the customer.



Friday the 13th: Our Modern Technology Fears


Fearing change is nothing new. citizenry are biologically programmed to be wary of the unknown, lest it provides a threat to their existence. However, the speed of change happening over the last century approximately is way greater than at the other point in human existence – fuelling an increase in technophobia.

Last year’s Survey of yank Fears saw technology take second place, losing out narrowly to man-made disasters like terrorism. In honour of Friday the 13th, we’ve taken a glance at a number of the creepier technological developments that are driving this anxiety.


DNA Hacking

Manipulating human DNA has long been the realm of fantasy , but it's fast becoming science fact. Developments in genetics and genomics have given scientists a greater understanding of our personal biology than ever before and for each dream of a disease-free world there's an alternate nightmare scenario. Could DNA hacking cause a replacement wave of personalised biological weapons designed to focus on specific individuals?

It may sound far-fetched, but there are already claims that the United States government collects and destroys personal items employed by the President to stop his DNA falling into the incorrect hands. Creepier still, WikiLeaks claimed in 2010 that the US was actively collecting biometric information belonging to other world leaders. True or not, there's certainly much potential permanently , and bad, to return from our genetic tampering.


Government Surveillance

Technology is unfairly portrayed because the enemy of private privacy, with Internet cookies, government metadata collection and GPS trackers giving the authorities access to an excellent deal of data regarding your whereabouts, actions and motives. Of course, there's also many technology, from encryption to VPNs, designed to shield your behaviour from surveillance. Big Brother might not be watching, but NSA revelations have certainly led many to believe that it's .


Tech Warfare

War has often brought out the dark side of technology, albeit it's going to ultimately find yourself saving lives. From destructive machines that fill our skies and seas to the atom bomb , technology has played a number one role in warfare for several years. Developments continue today through cyber warfare targeting foreign nations’ networks and computers and drone warfare on foreign lands. The latter, especially , has the potential to extend the sense of detachment surrounding warfare. With military personnel selecting targets from behind a display screen , taking a life could easily become a chilly and disinterested affair.


The Uncanny Valley

As robotics develops we are beginning to see machines that ever more closely resemble humans. Things start getting unsettling, however, when robots look almost human, but are clearly not. Psychologists describe this phenomenon because the “Uncanny Valley,” whereby observers exhibit a sense of revulsion at the purpose where a robot’s appearance becomes more human-like. samples of these creepy automaton’s are increasingly evident, including the Geminoid-F and Telenoid R1 robots, both designed by Hiroshi Ishiguro.


Artificial Intelligence

Although many of our modern-day technology fears are being encouraged by a media that feeds on scaremongering and hysteria, the threat of an AI-led disaster has received backing from variety of respected scientists and technology thought-leaders. An open-letter from the longer term of Life Institute urged AI research to mWhy performance versus promise matters within the cloud world


Industry analysts project that global software-as-a-service (SaaS) spending will still grow, from $49 billion in 2015 to $67 billion in 2018. IDC research supports this, suggesting that SaaS revenues are growing nearly five times faster than traditional software products. With this in mind, cloud really is now a reality for businesses today. And, as more companies come to trust and depend on the cloud, many are increasingly focusing their attention on requirements like service availability and performance.

After all, modern enterprises believe the cloud for his or her most crucial business systems, so it’s absolutely imperative that these applications are available and may be scaled up or down as required . This reliability builds trust, and thereupon trust comes a relationship between vendor and customer which will become a long-term engagement. Equally important, from a vendor perspective, is that trust helps inspire customer satisfaction, which is that the critical metric for fulfillment within the cloud world.

As more business applications move to a multi-tenant cloud deployment model, software vendors are being challenged to satisfy their entire customer base with one service-level agreement (SLA). Consumers became familiar with the user experience provided by companies like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn—services that rarely have any downtime longer than a browser refresh. Although some service interruptions are necessary and even mandatory—such as for major version updates—the expectation exists that they ought to be brief and unobtrusive.

As well as having seamless availability, customers also want their applications to remain up-to-date and historically this meant systems had to be pack up by vendors during updates. The headaches related to major upgrades of on-premise systems can leave customers months out-of-date in terms of maintenance updates, and with some vendors, there's a patchwork of service packs and bolt-on products to make sure users have the newest features. Extended downtime and an almost perpetual state of running yesterday’s version isn’t a recipe for keeping customers happy.

It’s at this junction of availability, reliability, and running the newest system that the journey to zero downtime really becomes important. Service availability in today’s connected, always-on world may be a whole different ball game to the legacy client/server world. within the cloud computing era, the responsibility for uptime and availability falls on the supplier’s shoulders.

So what should a best practice approach look like? one , workable SLA is very desirable, which approach should mesh with the way companies believe the planning and delivery of the merchandise – with an ultimate aim of achieving one code line, one version, and one customer community. Customers should have the chance to preview new releases before they are going live, in order that they enjoy testing and planning that takes place during this period. This brave new world is extremely different to the on-premise ERP upgrade experience, which normally requires months of designing and weeks of post-rollout fixes.

As more businesses shift to the cloud, questions also are being asked about the transparency of SLAs. does one know the specifics of your SLA? Are there any clauses in your contract that allow unscheduled downtime and still allow the seller to satisfy the agreed-upon SLA? Any lack of transparency around SLAs are some things customers should avoid.

That said, customers shouldn’t be thinking solely about the SLA promise once they check out the cloud, but more their chosen vendor’s past performance and, consequently, how successful they're going to be as a future partner to the business.

In the cloud world, vendors must continually earn the customer’s trust if they need to increase the connection long-term, because with a subscription model, the customer truly is on top of things . For this reason, it really is performance instead of promises that matters for businesses moving to the cloud today.



Understanding the new era of Internet governance


Henry Ford is reported to possess observed that “If I had asked people what they wanted, they might have said faster horses”.technology credit union Short enough to be popular on social media, this homage to leadership is as likely to be wont to damn ‘luddite’ dissenters today as at any time in history.

Yet whatever logic the old saying has when applied to genuinely revolutionary creations, the thought that leaders have monopolies on the simplest ideas, and thus that they will and in some cases should bypass public opinion , isn't without controversy. this is often particularly true where decisions are susceptible to erode those rights which are so fundamental to our daily lives that we simply take them without any consideration . we frequently see this tension within the development of digital media services, where new opportunities are purchased by revising our social and cultural foundations, or a minimum of our assumptions about the extent of these foundations.

Ongoing discussions within ICANN, the organisation that controls the name system, are putting a contemporary face on this value exchange. With historically low barriers to entry, the name system, and especially the new top-level domains (TLDs) like , offers new ways of conducting business and of expressing an opinion. But because the name system has grown in size and in importance, it's enabled a volume and variety of privacy and property infringements that might never be experienced offline.

Freedom of expression may be a fundamental right, of course; but so too are the rights to respect for personal life and to property, including property . Can these competing interests tend equal protection, or must one cede to the others? How, and by whom, should the balance be determined? Through the creation of bespoke rights protection mechanisms (RPMs), several TLD operators are taking the initiative to work out where the balance lies within their own domain spaces, but the absence of a worldwide solution to expressive-but-infringing content across all top-level domains means in practice many stakeholders remain with none remedy or protection against abusive behaviour. So, what to do?

Recent history shows how a worldwide solution might be achieved. In 1999 the worldwide Internet community created a coffee cost, accessible and, most significantly , supranational means of tackling cybersquatting and typo-squatting in domain names that also preserved Internet users’ rights to freedom of expression. As a results of contributions from stakeholders representing all aspects of the name system, the community created the Uniform name Dispute Resolution Policy (“UDRP”), an administrative procedure to which those selling domain names must now adhere so as to suits their contractual obligations to ICANN.

The UDRP has been an enormous success. It provides certainty to rightsholders and registrants alike, and it means disputes are often resolved without costly litigation and potentially life-changing damages or cost awards being made against a losing party. alittle number of interest groups want ICANN to reduce the UDRP as a part of its ongoing RPM review, but those groups haven't offered any compelling alternative. In fact, not only has the worldwide Internet community benefitted from the steadiness and predictability of the UDRP, but it's appropriate within the context of ICANN’s RPM review to think about whether the model of the UDRP might offer an answer to the problems raised above, and will be extended to deal with quite just the utilization of trade marks in domain names. there's little question that a collective process like that which created the UDRP would allow any proposed solutions to draw on the experience and perspectives of the disparate interest groups within the web community. That it might end in a globally-binding solution that might create A level playing field and will not be altered by mere bilateral agreement also favours this approach.

As shown by the steps taken by individual registry operators to develop their own RPMs, a replacement era of Internet governance is coming: the question that is still is what is going to it look like? Should conduct and content be regulated by bespoke solutions developed by commercial service providers, by minimum standards began by governments on behalf of their citizenry, by detailed rules prescribed by the worldwide Internet community, or by another means?


There are some ways for the community to urge involved during this debate, from attending ICANN meetings, to joining a list via http://icann.org, to liaising with technology and disputes lawyers conversant in ICANN. But regardless of the method you employ to possess your say, the time to urge involved is now.In today’s cloud era, the Chief Customer Officer has never been more vital

We’ve been living during a cloud era for a few time now and have watched its impact in transforming businesses, but what does it mean for customer service? Higher demands from customers have resulted during a new strategic role within organisations – the Chief Customer Officer. What does that role got to deliver in today’s cloud era to impact on company success?



Cloud and customer expectations

The dominance of cloud has heavily impacted customer expectations. As consumers, we've all become wont to having information available at our fingertips, whenever we would like it, wherever we are and however we would like to consume it. Forrester notes that “As customers become more familiar with digital touchpoints, their expectations increase.” this is often very true for newer generations, now born into a digital world.

It’s no different within the business world when serving an ever-growing digital generation. consistent with Forrester, “Millennials are getting the most important demographic group in your workforce. Their experience with digital technology shapes their expectations of and behavior within the workplace. They expect and wish high-quality technologies and simply consumable technology services that enable them to succeed.”

Forrester cites that we are now within the “age of the customer”. it's therefore time to prioritise people who have the foremost impact on a business – the customer. Customers expect the simplest service, products and knowledge and there's no reason for companies to fail in delivery. Again, like consumers, customers expect an equivalent level of service whenever and wherever they're and during a way they need to receive it.information technology degrees the great news is that the technology is there to assist , with cloud ERP eliminating friction and errors when handling customer facing processes to make satisfying experiences for everybody involved.

Introducing the Chief Customer Officer


With customer complacency now gone, customer loyalty is far harder to realize . because the cloud era gains more dominance and therefore the customer has become king, it's no surprise to ascertain an increase during a new role – Chief Customer Officer (CCO). This role is significant in ensuring companies remain competitive. The CCO has got to look both internally and externally to form sure the proper teams, technology, policies and processes are in situ to supply second-to-none customer service which it's felt by each and each customer.

Customer relationships have also been changing. not are they built on one-off transactions. Customer service is now liable for building long-term real relationships where every customer touch with a corporation is straightforward , enjoyable and valuable. it's only then when customer loyalty are often created. No-one expects a totally perfect service all of the time, but it's how companies interact in good times and bad, that also helps to formulate a robust relationship and one which can reap benefits within the long-term for both parties as they join .

A CCO must add tandem with all departments of a business, both back and front office, to make sure a customer features a smooth interaction. whether or not they want to shop for more, get advice, check status or maybe complain – each connection should be received with an equivalent level of enthusiasm, professionalism, consistency and accuracy, leading to strong customer satisfaction.


Impact of technology

Cloud technology, if implemented with the proper strategy, can impact dramatically on how a CCO can succeed. If each and each person during a company is in a position to ascertain an entire 360 degree customer view, the probabilities of excellence in customer service delivery are significantly improved. If anyone can view data from sales, finance, HR and services in one true customer record it provides great insight to offer more understanding of a customer, and what's needed to serve that customer well. It’s not enough to patch together different cloud apps, as which will still end in siloed information between departments resulting in a scarcity of consistency in how customers are served. To share data across all departments within the easiest method all cloud applications should get on an equivalent platform. Not all CCOs will have direct deciding when it involves technology, but the foremost savvy will ensure they need influence and therefore the absolute best opportunity to achieve exemplary customer service delivery.

The digital age has increased competition overall. Forrester states that “competition is increasingly supported the strength of your digital experiences and digital business. At an equivalent time, your customers’ expectations are formed by their best experiences in any industry.” Without a robust customer-centric position, a corporation can sit back as dissatisfaction is communicated publicly and quickly and a customer moves on to a different provider. Having a CCO in situ can make sure that customer-centricity remains a priority for all.


Customer service shift

Expectations driven within the cloud era mean that customers expect companies to make relationships with them. For too long many have rallied around to undertake and problem solve with those customers who aren't happy and not receiving the service they believe they need signed up for. A successful CCO will make sure the right touch points are in situ to still build relationships with satisfied and dissatisfied customers. This reduces attrition, increases retention and greatly improves the likelihood of cross-selling. Not only that, but it can help a corporation build fantastic references. Third party endorsement is simpler for others to look at and has more credibility than ever before.


The cloud era is about to remain , customer demand will still increase and therefore the CCO role is about to continue its rise. It’s a busy role, but vital for those companies who wish to win through during a digital age where companies must centre everything they are doing round the most vital party – the customer.



Friday the 13th: Our Modern Technology Fears


Fearing change is nothing new. citizenry are biologically programmed to be wary of the unknown, lest it provides a threat to their existence. However, the speed of change happening over the last century approximately is way greater than at the other point in human existence – fuelling an increase in technophobia.


Last year’s Survey of yank Fears saw technology take second place, losing out narrowly to man-made disasters like terrorism. In honour of Friday the 13th, we’ve taken a glance at a number of the creepier technological developments that are driving this anxiety.


DNA Hacking

Manipulating human DNA has long been the realm of fantasy , but it's fast becoming science fact.call center technology Developments in genetics and genomics have given scientists a greater understanding of our personal biology than ever before and for each dream of a disease-free world there's an alternate nightmare scenario. Could DNA hacking cause a replacement wave of personalised biological weapons designed to focus on specific individuals?

It may sound far-fetched, but there are already claims that the United States government collects and destroys personal items employed by the President to stop his DNA falling into the incorrect hands. Creepier still, WikiLeaks claimed in 2010 that the US was actively collecting biometric information belonging to other world leaders. True or not, there's certainly much potential permanently , and bad, to return from our genetic tampering.


Government Surveillance

Technology is unfairly portrayed because the enemy of private privacy, with Internet cookies, government metadata collection and GPS trackers giving the authorities access to an excellent deal of data regarding your whereabouts, actions and motives. Of course, there's also many technology, from encryption to VPNs, designed to shield your behaviour from surveillance. Big Brother might not be watching, but NSA revelations have certainly led many to believe that it's .


Tech Warfare

War has often brought out the dark side of technology, albeit it's going to ultimately find yourself saving lives. From destructive machines that fill our skies and seas to the atom bomb , technology has played a number one role in warfare for several years. Developments continue today through cyber warfare targeting foreign nations’ networks and computers and drone warfare on foreign lands. The latter, especially , has the potential to extend the sense of detachment surrounding warfare. With military personnel selecting targets from behind a display screen , taking a life could easily become a chilly and disinterested affair.


The Uncanny Valley

As robotics develops we are beginning to see machines that ever more closely resemble humans. Things start getting unsettling, however, when robots look almost human, but are clearly not. Psychologists describe this phenomenon because the “Uncanny Valley,” whereby observers exhibit a sense of revulsion at the purpose where a robot’s appearance becomes more human-like. samples of these creepy automaton’s are increasingly evident, including the Geminoid-F and Telenoid R1 robots, both designed by Hiroshi Ishiguro.


Artificial Intelligence

Although many of our modern-day technology fears are being encouraged by a media that feeds on scaremongering and hysteria, the threat of an AI-led disaster has received backing from variety of respected scientists and technology thought-leaders. An open-letter from the longer term of Life Institute urged AI research to make sure that we reap the advantages of the technology, “while avoiding potential pitfalls.” so far , the letter has been signed by quite 8,600 individuals, including Hawking , Elon Musk and Steve Wozniak.

Professor Hawking has also gone on record multiple times to elucidate the threat that AI poses to humanity. Crucially, once AI matches or surpasses current levels of human intelligence, it’s behaviour will become difficult to predict. Will it prove benign towards its creators, or as Professor Hawking warns, “spell the top of the human race?”

[t is important to notice that a lot of of the technologies listed above are some years from being realised, and albeit they're , they're likely to supply more advantages than causes for concern. it's not surprising that change can unnerve our modern-day sensibilities, but it's important that we don't let our fears substitute the way of innovation.

ake sure that we reap the advantages of the technology, “while avoiding potential pitfalls.” so far , the letter has been signed by quite 8,600 individuals, including Hawking , Elon Musk and Steve Wozniak.

Professor Hawking has also gone on record multiple times to elucidate the threat that AI poses to humanity. Crucially, once AI matches or surpasses current levels of human intelligence, it’s behaviour will become difficult to predict. Will it prove benign towards its creators, or as Professor Hawking warns, “spell the top of the human race?”

It is important to notice that a lot of of the technologies listed above are some years from being realised, and albeit they're , they're likely to supply more advantages than causes for concern. it's not surprising that change can unnerve our modern-day sensibilities, but it's important that we don't let our fears substitute the way of innovation.